Count us as not at all gobsmacked by the dead tree’s opposition to Governor Walker’s decision to turn down the "free" Medicare money. But we were struck by something in this paragraph from the editorial board’s denunciation:

 The governor's plan would force about 87,000 adults now in the Medicaid program onto the new federal insurance exchanges. That will make way for about 82,000 additional people to receive Medicaid who do not now qualify. Walker claims his plan will allow 224,600 more people to receive coverage…

Wait.

Walker’s plan will add 82,000 to Medicaid who don’t qualify now?

Since his plan limits Medicaid to people who are below the poverty line, this suggests that there were 82,000 poor people who were denied Medicaid by…. Who?

As it turns out, Jim Doyle.  You may recall, that Democrat governor tried to dramatically expand the state’s medical assistance programs, increasing eligibility levels up to 200% of the poverty line for single, childless adults. Doyle was, of course, widely praised for his vision and compassion.

But the numbers didn’t add up. So in October 2009, Doyle imposed enrollment caps on the Badger care Core Plan because he didn’t have enough money to meet faster than expected enrollment.

As a result, we had the bizarre situation here in which some individuals who made up to twice the poverty limit received Medicaid, while some genuinely poor individuals were left on a waiting list. Walker’s plan eliminates those caps, allowing thousands of poor individuals who had blocked by the Doyle caps to receive health coverage under Medicaid.

 We couldn’t help but recall this:

 Robert Kraig, the Executive Director of the union-front group Citizen Action of Wisconsin declared: "If Governor Walker turns down billions in federal money for BadgerCare, there is no doubt that many Wisconsinites will die as a consequence."

Our Google search engine is apparently not powerful enough to find Mr. Kraig, or any other prominent liberals, suggesting that Doyle’s artificial cap would result in any deaths. But we’ll keep looking.